Monday, November 27, 2017

on to the next!

Thank you so much for all of the lovely comments on Curt's quilt. I appreciate each and every one!

It felt great to focus on just one project and make significant progress in such a short time. Since I was on a roll, I decided to move on to the next! I had 4 quilt tops to choose from, so it was time.
I took advantage of the lovely weather this weekend and I basted this king size gingham quilt on my 3 season porch. It was helpful to have other people home so that they could help keep the puppies occupied, too. It took me nearly all day to piece the backing (all 9 1/2 yards of it!), trim the threads on the backside of the quilt top and pin the layers together. It took nearly all the floor space I had available. Oh, boy!
I've been debating between sending it out to my long arm quilter and quilting it myself for the past few months. Sure, it would have been easier to send it out....especially since the quilt measures 108" x 102". But, there is something kind of neat about quilting such a massive quilt yourself on a domestic sewing machine. (Maybe I have more stubbornness than good sense? Hahaha!) I definitely maxed out the throat space while quilting it, but really, it wasn't terrible. No more than 1/2 of the bulk needs to be in the throat at any one time. I will say, though, that it takes a lot of adjusting and readjusting of the quilt. A LOT!
Here's a photo of my quilting set up. I have a decent amount of table space to hold the bulk of the quilt behind the machine, and equally helpful is my ironing table to the left of my chair, which supports the rest of the bulk.
The loops certainly aren't perfect, and I've had to work on letting go of perfection as I quilt. (The struggle is real!) I've estimated that it will take me about 16 hours (!!!) to quilt it. Despite that, I'm still glad that I decided to quilt it myself.

I've got 17/50 lines of loops left to quilt, so I can see the light at the end of the tunnel. That certainly helps, too!

Happy Monday to you!

52 comments:

Janie said...

That's going to be a beauty!
Thanks for sharing your process, it encourages me.
I love your work.

Judy said...

I feel for ya'. I have quilted my far share of king-size quilts in my sewing machine. My shoulders and upper-arms ache when I get done, but oh the satisfaction.

Misty said...

Wow, your quilting looks great and the design you chose looks sonice with your quilt! From far away, it almost looks like vines creeping up the quilt.

Marie said...

okay -- take the plunge and purchase a long arm -- best investment I have ever made -- I found an older, slightly used, owned by grandma and loved well on Craig's List ...

trust me -- it will save your shoulders!

quilt is gorgeous!

Tami Von Zalez said...

Well, you are a brave woman - I quilted a couple of quilts with that limited throat space and said "Never Again!" Made the Mr. buy me a bigger Brother.
I also support my heavier quilts with my ironing board. Seems to work out just fine.
Now I am totally amazing that you don't have a "design wall" I hear and see so much about. I lay my fabric on the floor for major "designing."
One thing I do know that has made a BIG difference in the quilting process is to wind the quilt top on a long piece of board and then wind the quilt backing on another piece of board and insert the batting in between the two as I pin and straighten (there are YouTube tutorials on it). I figure you've got some type of amazing method because your quilts turn out so picture perfect!

Di~ said...

Thank goodness for "needle down"!!!

Yvonne @Quilting Jetgirl said...

The ironing board trick is one of my favorites to teach and employ! That is a massive quilt and I bet you'll be sleeping under it soon. :)

Debbie said...

Wow. I feel like a weenie being intimidated by the 60"x80" quilt I have waiting. I think it's party the design, but still. This is looking so good!

Kerry said...

It's beautiful. Love the quilting too.

I recently was watching a Craftsy course and I think it was either Marti Michell or Ann Petersen (or both?) where they removed half the batting to cut down on the bulk in the harp space. Now I'm not an expert and while I love the idea of not shoving a huge heavy quilt around, I'm not brave enough to take that step in case I can't get it joined up properly again! But then I haven't had over 100 inches both ways (just one side) so I choose the narrow width to play with at the start! Currently fighting a 90 x 90. Time to get my husbands rude looking massage gadget out!

Pamela Arbour said...

It looks impressive. I know what you mean about the quilting time. I try to start out with something simple and it still takes a lot of hours to finish the larger quilts!

Amy said...

You have inspired me. I have been sitting on my basted splendid sampler quilt for almost a year, unsure if I should attempt it on my home machine or send it out. If you can do it, so can I! Thank you for sharing your bravery.

house on hill road said...

I love that the loops aren't perfect. They are such a great choice with all the lines of the gingham. Lovely!

Marjorie's Busy Corner said...

Lovely...I like that the loops are all different. That's how I quilt...freehand.

Patty said...

This looks wonderful! Can't wait to see it finished.

Nancy @ Grace and Peace Quilting said...

Love your organic loops! They are perfect.

Paige said...

Love how the loops mirror on each row. Genius using the ironing board to support the quilt.

KaHolly said...

Looks great! You won’t be sorry you took it on when it’s finished!

The Joyful Quilter said...

At the rate you're going, you will have another finish by Friday!!!

Judy said...

Wow! I love that quilt; I loved it when you were piecing it, and I love the quilting. A perfect choice for all those squares.

CandyR said...

I love it!

Leslie Kohn said...

Your quilt looks PERFECT after you basted it. What patience! I would never attempt a quilt that large....the basting and quilting of it just intimidate me too much. I quilt all of my own quilts and I purposefully only make smaller quilts; I don't think I have the fortitude to quilt such a large quilt. But you do inspire me to go larger!

Your quilt is absolutely beautiful and the loops look great. I too am a perfectionist and I know that the struggle I would have with the loops would keep me from ever quilting again! Love the quilt design and love the quilting!

Mary in Peoria Handmade said...

Oh my goodness. I cannot believe you are quilting this large quilt on your domestic machine! It is a lovely quilt and nice quilting loops! Congrats to you.
mary in Az

grammajudyb said...

I am intrigued by your gingham quilt. I loved it before, now the quilting makes it even lovelier. Looking forward to seeing your binding choice.

MissPat said...

What I find most impressive (beside the size of the quilt you are working on) is that you are quilting it on an older mechanical Juki model, not a fancy-dancy expensive digital machine. Proves you don't need a $4,000 computerized wonder to make beautiful finishes.
Pat

tahoe34 said...

I just love the “imperfection.” I’ve never been crazy about the look of long arm quilting that looks as though a computer did the work. This is truly a work of art, Amanda Jean. As always, you inspire me!

Laura J. said...

Another beauty in the works!

FlourishingPalms said...

I totally admire and respect you for quilting this yourself! It's definitely do-able, and doesn't it make you feel such a HUGE sense of accomplishment?! I haven't used a longarm quilter since 2001, and I take great pride in saying that. Any and every quilt can be quilted on a home sewing machine. It only takes determination... and, as you said, perhaps a lack of "good sense." Wear it proudly! :-) Linda

Tammie Smith said...

You certainly do inspire! Love this one too!

Cathy Melancon said...

Amanda Jean, you are my hero for taking this big quilt on!!! You are doing a great job and your loops look fantastic!!! You got this, Girl!!!!!

Charlotte M. said...

Thank you for continuing to inspire me. I made a queen size quilt top and now am trying to talk myself in to quilting it. I know I can do it, but I won't start til after the holidays. I am not sure how I want to quilt it yet anyhow.

sansuey said...

WoW! I am impressed, amazed, and inspired by with and by you!

Deborah S said...

Love the colors in this quilt - and love how you are quilting this. Love all you do to inspire me but still not ready for a king size quilt!

AnnieQuilts said...

Totally understand the anti-perfection struggle! Love the gingham quilt. Keep up the great work and inspiration!

Cindy W. said...

You should be very proud of this quilt, all your quilts actually. It is very impressive, and inspirational the way you are taking this large quilt on. I'll be keeping you in mind when I tackle my own quilting on a domestic machine. Thank you.

J Sager said...

Amanda, This is beautiful! Do you ever have thread tear offs during your machine quilting? If so, how do you handle that? Thanks!

Ruth said...

I set up my 1947 Blackhead Singer machine between the snackbar and the dining room table, so the big quilts rest over my shoulder on the snackbar, go under the needle and throat of the machine, and then slide out across the plastic covered table. But I only quilt stitch-in-the-ditch. Those loops are really pretty!!

Pattypiecer said...

You are my hero. What a huge job and it looks great!

Bonita Fletcher said...

I know exactly what you mean about that sense of accomplishment of quilting such a large quilt on a domestic machine. I have a Juki too (because of you, lol) and I love the "slow and steady" rhythm of this process. Beautiful quilt!

Bessie said...

What a beautiful quilt!!! I love the loops you are quilting. I have a question. Do you start quilting on each square separately, or do you extend your loops onto the next square? It looks amazing!!! Bravo 👏👏👏🌟🌟🌟🙂🙂🙂

pennylanequilts said...

I love your tenacity tackling this huge quilt. You are a superstar in my book!

Robin (RsIslandCrafts) said...

The picture of the basted quilt is beautiful with all the pins lined up. I love the challenge of quilting large quilts on my domestic machine. I find that as long as I have patience and a good support system for the quilt it really isn't that hard.

Liz Rehrauer said...

Your quilt is beautiful. I, too, prefer to quilt my own quilts but I’ve found the large ones difficult. I have problems with free motion movement when I have so much bulk in the throat. Do you have any special tricks for that?

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dredziasty said...

Bardzo lubię takie projekty, świetnie sobie radzisz z maszyną do szycia :)
Impresariat muzyczny Polisound

Sandy said...

I can't think of anything neat about quilting a king quilt on your domestic machine except that it was you and not me! LOL You are brave! The loops really good. I think it would be boring if they were "perfect"!

T said...

What a gorgeous quilt!! You never cease to inspire!
T

Home Sewn By Us said...

Hi Amanda,
What a simply beautiful quilt. Your quilting design is also simple and it lets the fabrics and pattern shine together. Your pins all look so nice and neat, and what a fabulous three-season porch to use for layering! I can just imagine the puppies wanting to come out and help . . . ~smile~ Roseanne

Pieced Brain Quilt Designs said...

Your quilt is beautiful and, yes, you are crazy to quilt it on your domestic machine! I've done it myself so I know how much work and time is involved. Your loops are fantastic, though!

Anna said...

wow! I LOVE that quilting. Bravo!! I rarely sway from meandering loops or stippling -I'll have to give more structured loops a try.

Vicki said...

Love the colours you have chosen. Gingham quilts look so effective